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Climbing Ayers Rock: Best climbing video?

We've seen plenty of videos of people from all over the world climbing Ayers Rock but none as exuberant and entertaining as this one by travel/food Vlogger Josiah Hein.

If you think yours is just as good or better then please send us a link.


Love this king of the mountain shot...


Recent posts

Sydney Mining Club talk: Sleep Walking to Closure! Sundown for the Climb

The 242nd Sydney Mining Club presents

Sydney Mining Club Luncheon
On 4 April 2019at the Ivy Ballroom from12:30 pm Sleep Walking to Closure! Sundown for the Climb
Marc Hendrickx, Geologist and author
In a fascinating curtain raiser for OMH, geologist and author Marc Hendrickx will give us the low-down on a looming event in October. Geologists and Australians will face a disastrous loss of one particular and splendid freedom in October this year, our right to climb Uluru, and the reasons for it look decidedly dodgy. Since the conditional handover of ‘The Rock’, the Uluru – Kata Tjuta National Park, to its traditional Anangu owners in 1985, “the Climb”, that great Australian outback institution and flight of human spirit, undertaken by about 7 million Australian and international tourists has been closed 80% of the time for ‘safety’ reasons – the slightest breeze. In October 2019, the Climb will be officially banned for ‘cultural’ and ‘safety’ reasons, but these evaporate with scrutiny. Canbe…

Climbing Tales #9: Came saw and conquered

Climbing Tales 
This series celebrates Ayers Rock climbing experiences posted online.

#9 Came saw and conquered
Larene O'Neill shares her experience of climbing Ayers Rock at age 19 in 1972. A great tale that captures the essence of the experience.

The most unforgettable moment of my journey was deep in the heart of Australia, in the ancestral land of the Central Australian outback. The natural beauty and peacefulness of this vast desert is incredible. This magnificent natural beauty of what was called “Ayers Rock” left me with a memory lasting a lifetime. Something you can only appreciate from the experience.

It’s an amazing view from the top of Ayers Rock. I experienced an incredible uplifting rush of emotion, standing on top of Australia!


Read the rest of her tale via the link above.

The Last Logbook of Ayers Rock. Part 3 - Pages 31-50

This series of posts showcase the contents of the Last Logbook on Ayers Rock. Part 3: Cover and pages 31-50.

Last July when I climbed the Rock with my daughters I left a blank 192 exercise book in a tupperware container at the summit memorial. The front cover looked like this:

The text on the cover reads:
Signing the summit logbook has been an important cultural institution at Ayers Rock since the 1890s. Sadly, since the late 1980s Park Management have denied Australians and International visitors the opportunity to record their achievement. The first climbers to leave a note marking their achievement were Allan Breadon and W Oliver on March 4, 1897: “We added a few stones to the pile and left two wax vesta boxes (tins) with names and date thereon.”
Glass coffee jars held the names of climbers between 1932 and the 1950s. In September 1950 the jars held the names of about 70 climbers.
Formal log books, termed the “Achievers’ book”, replaced the assorted collection of jars and tins lodged…

Climb for Science 2019

Climb for Science: in Gosse's footsteps

Before it's closed, your chance to walk on the side of logic and reason!
A week of celebrations 14 - 20 July 2019.

50 years ago on the 20 July 1969 Neil Armstrong climbed down from the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle and took the first steps on the moon. On the same date, in 1873, in the remote Australian Outback explorer William Gosse and his cameleer, Kamran made the first recorded climb to the summit of the rock he named Ayers. While it's certain the locals climbed before him, Gosse's efforts in discovering the Rock and describing the region for the rest of the world represent a significant scientific achievement that is worth celebrating. Exploration of the solar system continues this worthy tradition of scientific discovery.
To participate in this year's event, simply climb the Rock during Climb for Science Week and post a photo of yourself on social media at the summit cairn in your Climb for Science gear and send us the link…

The Last Logbook: Part 2 - Pages 13-30

The Last Logbook of Ayers Rock.

This series of posts showcase the contents of the Last Logbook on Ayers Rock.
Part 2: Cover and pages 13-30.

Last July when I climbed the Rock with my daughters I left a blank 192 exercise book in a tupperware container at the summit memorial. The front cover looked like this:

The text on the cover reads:
Signing the summit logbook has been an important cultural institution at Ayers Rock since the 1890s. Sadly, since the late 1980s Park Management have denied Australians and International visitors the opportunity to record their achievement.The first climbers to leave a note marking their achievement were Allan Breadon and W Oliver on March 4, 1897: “We added a few stones to the pile and left two wax vesta boxes (tins) with names and date thereon.”
Glass coffee jars held the names of climbers between 1932 and the 1950s. In September 1950 the jars held the names of about 70 climbers.
Formal log books, termed the “Achievers’ book”, replaced the assorted collec…

Sold a pup: Climb is not off limits!

We have mentioned before the fact that Traditional Owners prior to 1991 had no issues with tourists climbing or accessing many other sites at Ayers Rock. The evidence is quite clear that there was wide consultation with the Traditional Custodians about what was appropriate tourist access at Ayers Rock prior to the take over by the Federal Government in 1985.

This snippet below from page 89 of In the Wake of the Tourist Chapter 3 (Dreamtime at Ayers Rock) further highlights the contradictions about tourist access being issued by the Board and Parks Australia. In banning the Climb and access to world heritage listed views, it's quite clear the Public have been sold a pup.

"Derek Roff, senior ranger at Ayers Rock-Mt. Olga National Park in 1975, says older aborigines tend to answer questions the way they think the questioner wants them answered. He believes that younger militants take advantage of this to exaggerate the religious significance of Ayers Rock. A committee considering…

Widespread Climbing Ban in the Grampians Announced

Myth, superstition and petty bureaucracy close access to more of our Natural Wonders.  Rock and Ice Magazine report on the announcement of widespread bans to climbing in the world famous Grampians. 
“On Tuesday this week various members of the climbing community, including representatives of the Victorian Climbing Club, Western Victoria Climbing Club and others, met with Parks Victoria [the government body that oversees Grampians National Park]. There we were informed that eight areas in the western Grampians are going to be closed to climbers. In the next two weeks, signs will be put at the closed areas and the closures will be policed with fines.”
From the Herald Sun:
Popular climbing in Grampians National Park to shut sites over cultural concerns “While we were not given specifics, we can be fairly certain that the areas will primarily be in the Victoria Range and will encompass many of the best crags in the Grampians,” a statement from the group says. Rumours about the climbing bans …

The Last Logbook: Part 1 - Cover and first 12 pages

The Last Logbook of Ayers Rock.

This series of posts showcase the contents of the Last Logbook on Ayers Rock.
Part 1: Cover and first 12 pages.

Last July when I climbed the Rock with my daughters I left a blank 192 exercise book in a tupperware container at the summit memorial. The front cover looked like this:


The text on the cover reads:

Signing the summit logbook has been an important cultural institution at Ayers Rock since the 1890s. Sadly, since the late 1980s Park Management have denied Australians and International visitors the opportunity to record their achievement.
The first climbers to leave a note marking their achievement were Allan Breadon and W Oliver on March 4, 1897: “We added a few stones to the pile and left two wax vesta boxes (tins) with names and date thereon.”
Glass coffee jars held the names of climbers between 1932 and the 1950s. In September 1950 the jars held the names of about 70 climbers. 
Formal log books, termed the “Achievers’ book”, replaced the assorted c…

Save the Climb!

Go fund me campaign launched.


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